Help recruit the next class of Coro Fellows

Do you have an eye for talent? Do you have a sixth sense for people who will be successful leaders in the future? Coro is asking ALUMNI, FRIENDS, and SUPPORTERS who know or have access to people with exceptional talent and passion for public affairs to help us recruit the top candidates for the 2016-2017 Coro Fellows Program. Are you surrounded by people ready to take the next step in their career and professional life? Are you constantly meeting new people you think would make excellent Coro Fellows? Don’t miss this opportunity to share about how Coro can develop and connect emerging leaders to our national network! 5 ways to find out if you’d make a perfect Coro Ambassador: 1. Do you have access to university students, programs, or faculty? 2. Have you met any graduate students looking for the next opportunity? 3. Does your downtown office–complete with the open floor plan–attract their fair share of hipster Millennial appeal? 4. Are you a member of other civic organizations, professional associations, and community groups ripe with raw talent? 5. Can you name at least 3 high-caliber people that you think should apply for Coro right now? If you answered “YES” to any of the following questions, then we need YOU to become a Coro Ambassador! Recruitment season for the 2016-2017 Coro Fellows class is underway and we need your help identifying qualified candidates to apply! Become a Coro Ambassador today! CLICK...

Moss Kanter on Leadership

Leadership icon Rosabeth Moss Kanter has released a new book, “Supercorps,” with findings from interviews with 350 organizations around the world. From the examples of those that are thriving, she has reaffirmed five well-known elements of leadership common to the most successful performers: 1. There is no leadership without a noble purpose.The best companies are guided by purpose, values and principles, and recognize their responsibility to the community. 2. Leaders see new needs, problems and find solutions. 3. They partner and collaborate. Don’t just think outside the box – think outside the building. That is, go beyond your own organization. 4. Empower people. This includes engagement of employees, “alumni,” and community members. Convene people in conversations and permit the flow of self-organizing activities. 5. Persist and persevere. Citing what she humorously calls “Kanter’s Law,” she reminds people that “everything can look like a failure in the middle.” “Middles” are difficult because: We can’t accurately forecast the future Unforeseen roadblocks arise that need to be dealt with People lose momentum; and Critics surface once things are under way who try to block change. These characteristics collectively require that leaders be courageous and flexible. They must be able to think big AND small to keep the vision in sight but deal with the details of execution. They must energize their team and shield them from the...

“Leading Through Conflict”

Mark Gerzon, founder and President of the Mediators Foundation, summarizes his view of leadership in his 2006 book Leading Through Conflict (Harvard Business School Press). He maintains that the we should think of the “Mediator” as the new model for leadership that “transforms differences into opportunities.” The Mediator: Strives to act on behalf of the whole, not just a part. Thinks systemically and is committed to ongoing learning. Builds trust by building bridges across the dividing lines. Seeks innovation and opportunity in order to transform conflict. He contrasts the Mediator with the “Demagogue,” who leads through fear, and at worst resorts to violence to dominate others, and the “Manager” works within his or her own boundaries, and limits the view of self-interest to his or her own group. The Mediator needs eight tools to work effectively. Gerzon describes them this way: Integral Vision: committing ourselves to hold all sides of the conflict, in all their complexity, in our minds – and in our hearts. Systems thinking: identifying all (or as many as possible) of the significant elementsrelated to the conflict situation and understanding the relationships between these elements. Presence: applying all our mental, emotional, and spiritual resources to witnessing the conflict of which we are now a part. Inquiry: asking questions that elicit essential information about the conflict that is vital to understanding how to transform it. Conscious conversation: becoming aware of our full range of choices about how we speak and listen. Dialogue: communicating in order to catalyze the human capacity for bridging and innovation. Bridging: building partnerships and alliances that cross the borders that divide an organization...

“The Leadership Challenge”

James Kouzes and Barry Posner have updated their classic book “The Leadership Challenge.” They continue to offer a straightfoward theory of five elements that successful leaders demonstrate, which they offer as guiding actions: Model the way (clarify your own values and lead by example) Inspire a shared vision (have an exciting image of the future and appeal to shared aspirations) Challenge the process (take initiative, seek innovation, generate small victories) Enable others to act (build relationships and advance the abilities of others) Encourage the heart (recognize individuals’ contributions and create a spirit of community) The first 2 chapters of “The Leadership Challenge,” 4th edition, are a concise summary of the ideas presented in the book. In addition to 25 years of research on how leaders act, they also looked at leadership from the constituents’ point of view, and present a summary of the values and behaviors people want from those they admire. The 4th edition is a current version of their ideas since it was updated in 2007 and includes case studies in the internet age as well as updates to their research...

Crowdsourcing and the Public Arena

Systems of democracy were created to allow public decisions to be made with the participation of people who lived in the democratically-governed society. The concepts of participation were always limited, however, by constraints of time and geography, by assumptions about the capacity of elites to govern better than the masses, by social limitations on the roles permitted for women, by exclusion of various “minority” groups, by connection of civic privileges with property ownership, and so forth. In the history of modern democracies, the trends have moved slowly but steadily toward the elimination of official barriers to participation, from allowing women to vote and eliminating poll taxes, to voting rights legislation and lowering of the voting age. (Today, England is considering lowering the voting age to 16.) Now, technology has also expanded participatory options for individuals. A great deal of government information is available online, unfiltered by interpreters. Internet activists can organize across geographic boundaries, provide public opinions to elected officials in real time, and mobilize individuals as issues are battled over. The breadth, speed and wide availability of online communication are opening the possibility of sharing ideas in the public arena the way they have begun to be implemented in business practices through “crowdsourcing.” “Crowdsourcing” is the idea that rather than of assigning a task to individuals or groups selected by the interested organization, instead, the task is thrown out to any audience to work on, usually through an open, online announcement or request. This approach presumes that the ideas, knowledge, imagination, etc. of this virtual, spontaneous group will generate the best solutions and will lead to the work being done by people most suited...